Twenty tracks of smoky and subdued jazz-tinged electronica and ambient, VoizNoiz mixes those predominant sounds with trip-hop, a bit of minimal reggae and techno, hip-hop and funk. In less than fifty minutes, Michel Banabila and a legion of musicians cram together as much modern urban music into twenty individual tracks, making nothing last much over three minutes in length. The moody ambient jazz of the opening Mono/Metro leads to a stark reggae-based Do Something About It! and then into a mutated funk Sorokin Blues. Voiz IV is filled with vague industrial chugging against a strangely thin guitar and a '70s television show feel. The urban soundscape is all about variety with a common thread, and Banabila and his associates parade proudly through the miasma, as Parade Bizarre so appropriately indicates in it's surreal carnival groaning. The casual stroll through the different faces of a bustling urban setting progresses with a leisurely pace, recording everything with a completely non-judgmental coolness, so the briefly weird Chickensoap can blissfully coexist with the quirky retro-pop of VoizIII and the chilled, otherworldly Where? with complete seamlessness. The urban landscape explored by Banabila and his Rotterdam collective seems a colourful netherworld of quixotic sounds, faces and rhythms, a modern wilderness of music, even somewhat tribal, as Ba-bylon and Azmignie suggest. VoizNoiz is a moody and multifaceted trip through the music of the modern urban world, and as such may not always be appealing, but sure enough to change in short order. (Phosphor)

VoizNoiz UrbanSoundScapes

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Music composer & sound artist. Michel Banabila releases music since 1983 and has produced musical scores for numerous films, documentaries, video art, theatre plays & choreographies. His music varies from minimal loop-based electronica, 4th world and neo-classical pieces, to drones, experimental electronica and tribal ambient. In addition to acoustic instrumentation, Banabila uses electronics, field recordings, and snippets from radio, tv and internet.