VITAL WEEKLY 837 : The Latest Research From The Dept. Of Electrical Engineering

The music from Michel Banabila I know for years, and I even met him a couple of times, although he doesn’t seem to remember. For years I left his releases with Dolf Mulder, thinking it still all be about world music fusing with elements of jazz and bits of electronics. But recently, very recently, I bumped into Michel again and he gave me this release, and pushed strongly his message: “you listen to it, as you will see I am also doing other music than world/jazz/ethnic/fusion etc” (alright, I have no idea which word he used there). Which of course I do, as I always do what people tell me, providing I bump into them. So, yes, indeed, this is indeed something else. I see, I hear. Like much of his other work, this too deals with rhythm, but its all more straight forward, almost like a (minimal) techno record in the best tradition of say Raster Noton (such as in ‘Machinery Aesthetics’ or in the usage of electrical interference sampled into a rhythm in ‘Guerilla Tactics’), but also with more bigger beats in ‘A Cold Wind Over Europe’, or, opposite ways, more ambient in ‘More Signals From Krakrot’, however ending with a strong, linear stomp and lots of guitars and reverb. Very electronic as well as electric, this is at times Pan Sonic/Goem/Alva Noto like and when the beats take more space, its not so much my cup of tea, but Banabila is right: not all of his works deal with all that I already mentioned, but he has more on his plate indeed. That makes me curious about more of this indeed.



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Music composer & sound artist. Michel Banabila releases music since 1983 and has produced musical scores for numerous films, documentaries, video art, theatre plays & choreographies. His music varies from minimal loop-based electronica, 4th world and neo-classical pieces, to drones, experimental electronica and tribal ambient. In addition to acoustic instrumentation, Banabila uses electronics, field recordings, and snippets from radio, tv and internet.