BOSTON HERALD : Spherics

Banabila, who handles the samples and edits, works with Piet Lichtveld (guitar); Jorien Muste (violin); and Bobby (cymbals, drone). The quartet combines to produce a lush, soothing orchestration that is parts Brian Eno and Snoop Dogg. Each of these seven movements is distinct, though they all have a pair of similarities: they are brooding and hypnotic. "Suma 4 - Blue Mix" is the album's standout. It features a slow beat and warm percussion. The track flows with slow and even layers. At the opposite end of the spectrum is "Worm-Jazz," a heavier, noisier track. Most of these cuts have a low end that powers the trance-like beat. "Tic Tac" settles into a funky groove after opening with some nifty organ. At points, some of these tracks take on a drone-like quality that can be jarring if not downright troublesome. "Science Freak" features a grinding that sounds like (but is not) a record needle on mucked-up vinyl. It's a little too jarring. With "Spherics," Banabila has created a backing track for everyday life. It is moody and low and it hardly ever fails to satisfy.

Michael J. Ryan.

Spherics

 

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Music composer & sound artist. Michel Banabila releases music since 1983 and has produced musical scores for numerous films, documentaries, video art, theatre plays & choreographies. His music varies from minimal loop-based electronica, 4th world and neo-classical pieces, to drones, experimental electronica and tribal ambient. In addition to acoustic instrumentation, Banabila uses electronics, field recordings, and snippets from radio, tv and internet.